New Poll Reveals: Online Harassment’s Still A Problem Despite Action Taken By Social Networks   Folks, two years ago, the Craig Newmark Philanthropic Fund, Rad Campaign, and Lincoln Park Strategies polled 1,007 Americans to figure out how much people were harassed online. Recently a comparison poll was conducted to see how things have changed. The data that was gathered was put into an infographic, which you can check out here. The question: Are social media outlets doing enough to keep harassers out?  What was discovered is that sexual harassment has decreased, but political harassment’s up from 16% to 30%. You may have heard about Ghostbusters 2 star Leslie Jones and her terrible experiences with online harassment, particularly racist and sexist hate speech. In an interview with Seth Meyers, Jones said she teamed up with the CEO of Twitter to get several accounts shut down. Now, she’s making an effort to distinguish the difference between hate speech and freedom of speech.  The poll also revealed that the majority of people who are harassed online are people of color. That’s really concerning and illustrates why we need to do better.  It was also found that women want stricter laws to stop online harassment. In 2014, the poll found that the same percentage of men and women (16%) thought online harassment laws were “just right.” This year, 16% of men and only 9% women are content with current laws regarding online harassment.   “What we’re seeing by examining trends longitudinally is that online harassment is not an easy fix. Despite some efforts by social networks to incorporate policies to stop online harassment, the problem is not going away,” said social media consultant Allyson Kapin of Rad Campaign, a partner in the online harassment poll. “Clearly we need to institute better tools, algorithms, and policies to support and empower people online, such as better methods for reporting harassment, as well as more effective and timely responses from the social networks themselves.”  Here are some key findings from the 2016 poll:  - Across all platforms, Facebook is the dominant location for harassment, even among heavy Twitter users.  - Tinder users report the highest levels of online harassment. 62% of daily Tinder users (3/4 of whom are millennials) say that they’ve been harassed online.  - Harassment is not anonymous. In almost 2 out of 3 instances (61%), respondents report knowing their harassers.  - Younger people are harassed more than older folks.  47% of millennials have either personally experienced harassment, or know someone who has. This percentage remains unchanged since 2014, despite policies implemented by social networks to address this.  - Women are harassed more than men. Of adults who reported harassment in 2016, 55% are women; 45% are men. The number for women is slightly down from 2014; for men slightly up.  - Harassment via email has increased. As more people use email daily, email harassment has risen from 20% to 25% from 2014 to 2016.  “While there are a few pieces of good news in the data, overall we still have a long way to go to solve this pressing problem,” said Stefan Hankin, President of Lincoln Park Strategies. “Given the amount of attention that this issue has received over the past couple years, we would expect to see more dramatic shifts in the numbers, but that was not the case. If companies and individuals are looking to truly solve this problem, we are going to need to rethink our approach.”  Folks, we’ve got to continue to speak out about online harassment. It’s up to all of us to do our part, to report bad actors, and encourage civility. The social media networks can’t do it alone, though they’ve definitely got their work cut out for them. What suggestions do you have for combating online harassment?  The poll was conducted by the Craig Newmark Philanthropic Fund, Rad Campaign, and Lincoln Park Strategies. 1,017 Americans ages 18 and over were polled about their experiences with online harassment. The margin of error is ±3.07 percent at the 95 percent confidence level.      

New Poll Reveals: Online Harassment’s Still A Problem Despite Action Taken By Social Networks

Folks, two years ago, the Craig Newmark Philanthropic Fund, Rad Campaign, and Lincoln Park Strategies polled 1,007 Americans to figure out how much people were harassed online. Recently a comparison poll was conducted to see how things have changed. The data that was gathered was put into an infographic, which you can check out here. The question: Are social media outlets doing enough to keep harassers out?

What was discovered is that sexual harassment has decreased, but political harassment’s up from 16% to 30%. You may have heard about Ghostbusters 2 star Leslie Jones and her terrible experiences with online harassment, particularly racist and sexist hate speech. In an interview with Seth Meyers, Jones said she teamed up with the CEO of Twitter to get several accounts shut down. Now, she’s making an effort to distinguish the difference between hate speech and freedom of speech.

The poll also revealed that the majority of people who are harassed online are people of color. That’s really concerning and illustrates why we need to do better.

It was also found that women want stricter laws to stop online harassment. In 2014, the poll found that the same percentage of men and women (16%) thought online harassment laws were “just right.” This year, 16% of men and only 9% women are content with current laws regarding online harassment. 

“What we’re seeing by examining trends longitudinally is that online harassment is not an easy fix. Despite some efforts by social networks to incorporate policies to stop online harassment, the problem is not going away,” said social media consultant Allyson Kapin of Rad Campaign, a partner in the online harassment poll. “Clearly we need to institute better tools, algorithms, and policies to support and empower people online, such as better methods for reporting harassment, as well as more effective and timely responses from the social networks themselves.”

Here are some key findings from the 2016 poll:

- Across all platforms, Facebook is the dominant location for harassment, even among heavy Twitter users.

- Tinder users report the highest levels of online harassment. 62% of daily Tinder users (3/4 of whom are millennials) say that they’ve been harassed online.

- Harassment is not anonymous. In almost 2 out of 3 instances (61%), respondents report knowing their harassers.

- Younger people are harassed more than older folks.  47% of millennials have either personally experienced harassment, or know someone who has. This percentage remains unchanged since 2014, despite policies implemented by social networks to address this.

- Women are harassed more than men. Of adults who reported harassment in 2016, 55% are women; 45% are men. The number for women is slightly down from 2014; for men slightly up.

- Harassment via email has increased. As more people use email daily, email harassment has risen from 20% to 25% from 2014 to 2016.

“While there are a few pieces of good news in the data, overall we still have a long way to go to solve this pressing problem,” said Stefan Hankin, President of Lincoln Park Strategies. “Given the amount of attention that this issue has received over the past couple years, we would expect to see more dramatic shifts in the numbers, but that was not the case. If companies and individuals are looking to truly solve this problem, we are going to need to rethink our approach.”

Folks, we’ve got to continue to speak out about online harassment. It’s up to all of us to do our part, to report bad actors, and encourage civility. The social media networks can’t do it alone, though they’ve definitely got their work cut out for them. What suggestions do you have for combating online harassment?

The poll was conducted by the Craig Newmark Philanthropic Fund, Rad Campaign, and Lincoln Park Strategies. 1,017 Americans ages 18 and over were polled about their experiences with online harassment. The margin of error is ±3.07 percent at the 95 percent confidence level.

 

 

3 Ways We Can Get More Girls and Women in Tech   Folks, it’s important to support women in tech. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (as reported by TechRepublic), 68% of women enroll in college—compared to 63% of men, and women increasingly outnumber men in college graduation rates. Despite these stats, women still make up only a quarter of the tech industry workforce. And women who work in computer and mathematical occupations make 84 cents to every dollar a man earns, according to Narrow the Gapp.  Here’s an example—Indiana University has 8,000 freshmen every fall, and half of ‘em are women, but science and computing isn’t even on the radar for 97% of them. What’s the deal with that?  Young girls get fewer chances to explore subjects like math or science, partly because of a lack of encouragement and also because of negative stereotypes about girls’ technical abilities, according to CNET.  Another factor’s that when schools have tech programs, they’re often primarily targeting boys. In this NPR podcast, host Michael Martin talked to one tech woman, Ana Roca Castro, Founder of LATISM, which brings together Latinos in tech, innovation, and social media. Castro said that women’s hesitance toward getting into tech is as much of an issue in high school as it is in college. She talked about how starting college is intimidating enough, and being the only woman in a tech class full of men who make jokes and call women names isn’t exactly doing the job of encouraging women to pursue tech careers.  Here’s some ways we can combat the lack of women in the tech sector:   1. Get more girls in coding in middle school (or earlier).     Studies show that early exposure to programming is part of what encourages women to ultimately get into tech. There are lots of good orgs that focus on this specifically, such as Girl Develop It, Black Girls Code, and Girls Who Code.   2. Encourage girls’ involvement in Advanced Placement computer science and college-level computer science courses.   According to a recent reporting from the College Board, girls’ enrollment in AP Computer Science is as low as 14%, which makes it the most gender-skewed AP class in the country.   3. Foster an inclusive environment for women, no matter the workplace.   As mentioned before, having very few women in an office dominated by men tends to foster exclusive talk and a hostile environment. Everyone can do their part in making workplaces more welcoming–it could be as simple as trusting that a woman’s able to do her job and encouraging her to ask for promotions and negotiate salaries.  Folks, these stats aren’t something that should be taken lightly. To help out, I focus a lot of my philanthropic efforts toward supporting women-led startups and women in tech.   My take is, until we make a conscious effort to encourage more women to go into tech, start offering equal pay, and really acknowledge the cultural biases that come with women in tech, we’re not going to get anywhere, and that’s not good enough…  What do you think we can do better?

3 Ways We Can Get More Girls and Women in Tech

Folks, it’s important to support women in tech. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (as reported by TechRepublic), 68% of women enroll in college—compared to 63% of men, and women increasingly outnumber men in college graduation rates. Despite these stats, women still make up only a quarter of the tech industry workforce. And women who work in computer and mathematical occupations make 84 cents to every dollar a man earns, according to Narrow the Gapp.

Here’s an example—Indiana University has 8,000 freshmen every fall, and half of ‘em are women, but science and computing isn’t even on the radar for 97% of them. What’s the deal with that?

Young girls get fewer chances to explore subjects like math or science, partly because of a lack of encouragement and also because of negative stereotypes about girls’ technical abilities, according to CNET.

Another factor’s that when schools have tech programs, they’re often primarily targeting boys. In this NPR podcast, host Michael Martin talked to one tech woman, Ana Roca Castro, Founder of LATISM, which brings together Latinos in tech, innovation, and social media. Castro said that women’s hesitance toward getting into tech is as much of an issue in high school as it is in college. She talked about how starting college is intimidating enough, and being the only woman in a tech class full of men who make jokes and call women names isn’t exactly doing the job of encouraging women to pursue tech careers.

Here’s some ways we can combat the lack of women in the tech sector:

1. Get more girls in coding in middle school (or earlier).  

Studies show that early exposure to programming is part of what encourages women to ultimately get into tech. There are lots of good orgs that focus on this specifically, such as Girl Develop It, Black Girls Code, and Girls Who Code.

2. Encourage girls’ involvement in Advanced Placement computer science and college-level computer science courses.

According to a recent reporting from the College Board, girls’ enrollment in AP Computer Science is as low as 14%, which makes it the most gender-skewed AP class in the country.

3. Foster an inclusive environment for women, no matter the workplace.

As mentioned before, having very few women in an office dominated by men tends to foster exclusive talk and a hostile environment. Everyone can do their part in making workplaces more welcoming–it could be as simple as trusting that a woman’s able to do her job and encouraging her to ask for promotions and negotiate salaries.

Folks, these stats aren’t something that should be taken lightly. To help out, I focus a lot of my philanthropic efforts toward supporting women-led startups and women in tech. 

My take is, until we make a conscious effort to encourage more women to go into tech, start offering equal pay, and really acknowledge the cultural biases that come with women in tech, we’re not going to get anywhere, and that’s not good enough…

What do you think we can do better?

How You Can Support America’s Heroes This 4th of July   Folks, the  Veterans Charity Challenge  kicked off a few weeks ago. This is a great opportunity to support nonprofits supporting America’s heroes. It’s our 4th year hosting the Challenge, and the nonprofits have already raised more than 44% of the money raised last year—this is a really big deal.  As of right now, $121,156 has been raised. The crowdfunding competition will benefit orgs helping out veterans, military families, police officers, and firefighters. The charity that raises the most money by the end of the challenge receives a $20,000 donation. The Craig Newmark Philanthropic Fund (CNPF) is donating a total of $50K to help out.  Along the way, the CNPF thrown in some weekly  Bonus Challenges  where orgs can win up to $11,500. The past 5 weeks have seen lots of winners, from Hero Dogs to Veteran Tickets Foundation. I’m looking forward to what these nonprofits will do with money raised to help the folks who are giving back.  This is the last week of the Bonus Challenges. So this means that from June 28 through July 6, if your org raises at least $1,500, you’ll be entered for a chance to win $1,500. Just make sure your money’s in by 1:59:59 pm ET, when the Challenge ends. Click  here  for all the info.   Click here to support a nonprofit who’s participating in the Challenge. Even a small donation can really make a difference.   Just a reminder:  - The top raising charity will receive a  $20,000  donation,  - Second place will get $10,000,  - Third will get $5,000,  - Fourth will get $2,500,  - And fifth will receive $1,000.  - Plus, there’s a total of $11,500 in weekly  Bonus Challenges  being given away, as well.  While it’s important to support service members every day, if you’re looking for a way to do so as the 4th of July approaches, I’d encourage everyone who’s able to reach out and donate what you can to help out veterans, service members, and their families. It’s the least we can do…

How You Can Support America’s Heroes This 4th of July

Folks, the Veterans Charity Challenge kicked off a few weeks ago. This is a great opportunity to support nonprofits supporting America’s heroes. It’s our 4th year hosting the Challenge, and the nonprofits have already raised more than 44% of the money raised last year—this is a really big deal.

As of right now, $121,156 has been raised. The crowdfunding competition will benefit orgs helping out veterans, military families, police officers, and firefighters. The charity that raises the most money by the end of the challenge receives a $20,000 donation. The Craig Newmark Philanthropic Fund (CNPF) is donating a total of $50K to help out.

Along the way, the CNPF thrown in some weekly Bonus Challenges where orgs can win up to $11,500. The past 5 weeks have seen lots of winners, from Hero Dogs to Veteran Tickets Foundation. I’m looking forward to what these nonprofits will do with money raised to help the folks who are giving back.

This is the last week of the Bonus Challenges. So this means that from June 28 through July 6, if your org raises at least $1,500, you’ll be entered for a chance to win $1,500. Just make sure your money’s in by 1:59:59 pm ET, when the Challenge ends. Click here for all the info.

Click here to support a nonprofit who’s participating in the Challenge. Even a small donation can really make a difference.

Just a reminder:

- The top raising charity will receive a $20,000 donation,

- Second place will get $10,000,

- Third will get $5,000,

- Fourth will get $2,500,

- And fifth will receive $1,000.

- Plus, there’s a total of $11,500 in weekly Bonus Challenges being given away, as well.

While it’s important to support service members every day, if you’re looking for a way to do so as the 4th of July approaches, I’d encourage everyone who’s able to reach out and donate what you can to help out veterans, service members, and their families. It’s the least we can do…